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Say His Name

By Jeff Koch on March 7, 2017.

Season 50, Game 62
San Antonio 112, Houston 110
49-13, 2nd in the West

His name is Kawhi Leonard.

Good lord, that was a fun game (It’s easy to say that in retrospect, rooting for the victor. Rockets fans might have a different perspective), capped off by as sudden and definitive a submission into the MVP race as you’ll ever find by one Mr. Kawhi Leonard.

With one shot and one block, Kawhi let it be known to the NBA world that he is the greatness we aspire for in our best. As Spurs fans, we’re spoiled getting to watch him play night in and night out. I’ve literally seen every second Kawhi has been on the floor this season. Last night was the rest of the NBA’s glimpse into what we all already know.

I won’t say Kawhi is the definitive MVP. I don’t watch Harden, Westbrook, or LeBron the way I watch Kawhi. Just as the rest of the world has a blindspot for Kawhi, I see too much of him. And too little of the others. He is the player I would choose over any other right now. He is the reason I can hardly believe my luck as a Spurs fan, getting to root for a championship team and All-NBA caliber player for going on 20+ straight years now.

But here’s the dirty little secret even Spurs fans are reticent to admit to themselves: we never thought Kawhi would be this good. We never thought he’d be Tim Duncan-level. It’s almost blasphemous to speak the thought aloud and give it life. But there it is: Kawhi might end up being as good as Duncan was.

He is already a more dominant and more complete offensive player. Duncan is probably the first or second best defensive player ever, and by virtue of being a big man, his importance on that end will always outshine Kawhi’s. But Kawhi is already in the conversation for most devastating perimeter defender of all time, to go along with an ever-blossoming dominant offensive game.

Both players are perfect fits for their eras. (Another reason Spurs fans should be blessed.) Duncan came to dominance in a time when big men defined championship teams, and size and defense were the building blocks. In today’s era, with the game getting smaller and faster, having the dominant wing (LeBron being the absolute prototype) is the path to dominance. You need a player who can play both big and small, who can shoot, drive, pass, and run the offense, without being overpowered or outmatched on either end of the court.

I love Kawhi. I love everything about his game. This season has been one of my favorites almost entirely because of him. But it wasn’t until Monday night that I ever entertained the notion that he might go down in Spurs’ history as Duncan’s equal.

Monday night was the first time I ever entertained the notion that Kawhi might be the foundation upon which more championships are won. Sooner rather than later.

His name is Kawhi Leonard.

The Spurs go for win number 50 on Wednesday night in San Antonio against the now Boogie-less Kings.

Go Spurs Go.